The NOAA Marine Debris Program Awards Funding to 23 New Projects

Posted Thu, 08/16/2018 - 11:00

Following a highly competitive merit review process, the NOAA Marine Debris Program is pleased to announce the 23 recipients of our 2018 prevention and removal grant awards totaling approximately $2.5 million in federal funds.  With each project, federal funding is matched by non-federal contributions, bringing the total investment of these marine debris projects to $5.5 million.  These awards will support efforts to address the pervasive national and global problem of marine debris that can impact wildlife, navigation safety, human health, and the economy.

Back to School Special: What are you going to throw away this school year?

Posted Tue, 08/14/2018 - 11:29

The days are getting shorter and cooler, and soon teachers and students alike must say goodbye to the lazy, hazy days of summer. The new school year can be a new beginning, so why not take this time to build some better habits in the classroom? If you want to reduce the amount of waste your class produces, a great way to start is to understand what you already throw away and recycle. Figure out how much waste your class creates through a trash audit!

Understanding Microplastics In Seafood

Posted Tue, 08/07/2018 - 15:27

 

Research is an important part of our fight against marine debris. It allows us to advance our understanding of how debris impacts the environment, and improves our ability to target and address the problem in the future. Recent research has shown that marine debris, such as microplastics (plastics less than 5mm in size), can be ingested by fish and species that filter their food out of the water. In order to improve our understanding of marine debris, the NOAA Marine Debris Program supports original and hypothesis-driven research projects which focus on the potential risk to wildlife from debris exposure and ingestion.

Taking on Tackle: Removing Derelict Fishing Gear

Posted Wed, 07/25/2018 - 17:28

Lost and discarded fishing gear is hazardous, and can be a difficult marine debris problem to address. Once lost, nets, lines, and traps can entangle wildlife, create major hazards to navigation, and damage sensitive and important habitats. Because gear can have few identifying characteristics, it can be difficult to track its location, or find its source. In order to reduce the impacts to coastal habitats from derelict fishing gear (DFG), the NOAA Marine Debris Program funds projects that remove and prevent the continued impacts of fishing debris.

Partnering for Monitoring

Posted Thu, 07/19/2018 - 17:54

Since beginning in 2012, the NOAA Marine Debris Monitoring and Assessment Project (MDMAP) has brought forth invaluable data, which continues to increase our shared knowledge of marine debris. Partners from around the world have contributed to this dataset by conducting 4,421 surveys at 335 monitoring sites in nine countries. The NOAA Marine Debris Program (MDP) coordinates these efforts, which would not be possible without the dedication of MDMAP partners who lead the charge in collecting data through their passion for the ocean. Both new and experienced MDMAP partner organizations and volunteers contribute time, energy, and resources to expand our understanding of this global issue.

On a Mission to Monitor Shoreline Marine Debris

Posted Wed, 07/18/2018 - 21:08

Marine debris is unfortunately an all too frequent sight on our coastlines. A common misconception is that all shoreline debris was left behind by beachgoers. In fact, debris makes its was to the beach from many different sources, including the sea, stormwater runnoff, wind, and nearby river or stream outlets. If you spend time exploring shorelines in different regions, you may notice that the types and amounts of debris are different from place to place (and constantly changing!).

Large Debris Creates Large Problems

Posted Tue, 07/17/2018 - 19:06

The presence of marine debris creates numerous problems for the environment, marine life, and humans. Large marine debris presents its own unique challenges, threatening the ocean, coasts, and waterways by obstructing navigational channels, causing harm to important habitat, and diminishing commercial and recreational activities. Removing large debris requires significant financial and technical resources.