Posts tagged with

California

The Marine Debris Leadership Academy: Spanning Boundaries to Tackle Marine Debris in the Tijuana River Watershed emily.greene Thu, 02/08/2024 - 20:58

Located in Imperial Beach, California, the Tijuana River National Estuarine Research Reserve (TRNERR) sees challenges as opportunities to utilize trinational collaboration in addressing the social-ecological impacts of marine debris. With support from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Marine Debris Program (NOAA MDP) provided through the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement Implementation Act, the ResiDUOS project was created to collaboratively develop a community-driven circular economy pilot project, capture and characterize trash, remove debris in critical natural habitats, and develop a binational emergency response guide to flooding. 

Exploring How Trash Travels in the San Diego River emily.greene Tue, 10/24/2023 - 15:16

Where does marine debris originate, and how does it make its way to the ocean? There are many possible avenues for land-based trash to become marine debris. In Southern California, San Diego State University (SDSU)  is working to find the answers. This multi-departmental project at SDSU is quantifying marine debris in the highly urbanized San Diego River and working to better understand how it travels through our waterways. 

New Report: Marine Debris on the shoreline of Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary madison.piascik Fri, 10/20/2023 - 12:51

New Report: Marine Debris on the shoreline of Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary: An assessment of activities contributing to marine debris, categories and composition, spatial distribution and predictor variables.

A Great State With Great Efforts: Addressing Marine Debris Throughout California Shanelle.Naone Wed, 03/01/2023 - 11:00

The NOAA Marine Debris Program supports various partners involved in marine debris research, prevention, and removal throughout California. Local universities, nonprofits, and state and federal agencies make up the many hands that are addressing microplastics, single-use plastics, fishing gear, and large-scale marine debris, such as abandoned and derelict vessels. From up north, to down south, and across shared border communities, these partners and their efforts create a comprehensive response to California’s marine debris issues.

From Fellowship to Fellow Teammate!

Posted Tue, 11/15/2022 - 11:00

In 2020, I began my California Sea Grant Extension Fellowship with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Debris Program. I was brought on to help the California Regional Coordinator implement marine debris projects and strategies in California. Over the course of my fellowship, I had the opportunity to lead a statewide marine debris action plan, support strategic internal efforts, and partake in countless professional development opportunities. This experience has improved my confidence as a young professional, guided my career path, and has certainly prepared me for my next chapter and future career.

Channeling Conservation in the Channel Islands: One Lobster Trap, Balloon, and Piece of Plastic at a Time

Posted Thu, 06/23/2022 - 17:00

Staff, faculty, and students at California State University Channel Islands (CSUCI) Santa Rosa Island Research Station have been working to monitor and remove marine debris from portions of Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands since 2015. With support from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, over 7,500 pounds of debris have been removed from the islands since 2020. This three-year project is an extension of past research and collaborative efforts of partners across the Channel Islands. CSUCI invited the NOAA Marine Debris Program California Regional Coordinator and the program’s California Sea Grant Extension Fellow for a week-long site visit to remove and assess the amounts, types, and sources of marine debris on Santa Rosa Island.

Preventing Cigarette Litter in San Francisco

Posted Tue, 03/15/2022 - 11:00

Much of San Francisco’s beauty comes from its stunning location, surrounded by the Pacific Ocean and San Francisco Bay. San Francisco is also the second-most densely populated city in the United States and one of the country’s most-visited destinations. With so many people near so much water, the marine environment is especially vulnerable to all forms of human-made pollution, including cigarette butts, the most littered item in San Francisco and around the world.

The Many Hands of California’s Marine Debris Community

Posted Wed, 03/02/2022 - 11:00

About 70% of Californians believe their ocean and beaches are very important to California’s future and report that plastics and marine debris are a big problem on a coast near them. As a result, organizations, individuals, and volunteers from across the state are contributing an enormous and noble amount of time and energy to make California a national leader on addressing and preventing marine debris.

Report on Reducing Shotgun Wad Debris in San Francisco Bay Now Available

Posted Tue, 05/25/2021 - 14:00

Consistent shoreline monitoring and data gathering efforts are essential to understanding local marine debris issues, how they change over time, and what types of debris are most common. Between 2012 and 2018, monthly marine debris monitoring surveys were conducted at six Greater Farallones National Marine Sanctuary beaches, located on the North-Central California Coast near San Francisco, and identified shotgun wads as one of the four most commonly found plastic items across all surveyed sites. A project to reduce plastic shotgun wad debris from entering San Francisco Bay and depositing onto coastal beaches was carried out and is documented in the report, “A Behavior Change Campaign to Reduce Plastic Shotgun Wad Debris on the North-Central California Coast.”

Preventing Marine Debris One Cool Earth Strategy at a Time

Posted Thu, 04/29/2021 - 11:00

Students, teachers, and school administrators all have their own parts to play in the vision of One Cool Earth’s Earth Genius marine debris education program in San Luis Obispo, California. This unique educational program partners with schools to incorporate marine debris education, practices, and principles throughout public school systems, from classrooms and cafeterias to school facilities and administration.