Posts tagged with

prevention

What Do You Know About Talking Trash?

Posted Wed, 06/10/2020 - 09:50

People all over the world are concerned about marine debris and they would like to know more about it. The NOAA Marine Debris Program’s Communications Team responds to those questions we receive through email, and we’ve seen a trend. Following the National Ocean Services theme of Ocean Trivia for this week, we have created our own marine debris “trivia questions” that we hope you enjoy!

Urban Ocean Welcomes First Cohort of Cities to the Ocean Plastics Fight

Posted Tue, 06/02/2020 - 08:27

Ocean Conservancy and its partners launched the Urban Ocean initiative just over a year ago with funding from the NOAA Marine Debris Program. Urban Ocean was designed to provide a platform for city governments to connect with one another as well as with community leaders, academia, and the private sector to develop, share, and scale solutions to the ocean plastics crisis while advancing their broader urban development priorities.

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Keeping Current with Marine Debris in Florida and the Caribbean

Posted Fri, 03/27/2020 - 13:45

The NOAA Marine Debris Program’s Florida and Caribbean region includes the state of Florida and the territories of Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands (USVI; St. Croix, St. John, and St. Thomas). This area is surrounded by clear blue water full of diverse coral reefs, fish, and other marine life. The region is no stranger to tourism, fishing, and natural hazards, such as hurricanes, and each of these events can generate marine debris.

Teaming Up to Keep Mardi Gras Crazy Fun & Crazy Clean!

Posted Wed, 02/19/2020 - 09:16

Mardi Gras season is one of the south’s most anticipated traditions, with costumes, beads, parades, and balls, the Mississippi Gulf Coast is alive with festivities. Unfortunately, these beloved celebrations leave behind large amounts of trash that takes days to pick up. Debris that is left in streets and on sidewalks can be blown or washed into storm drains, causing blockage that increases flooding, or into the local environment creating a hazard to wildlife.

Connected by the Sea and Combating Debris in the Pacific

Posted Thu, 02/13/2020 - 15:39

The Pacific Ocean bonds and connects many islands and people throughout the region. These communities share in the art and science of traditional navigation, which has fostered an intimate attachment to the ocean over many generations. Today, these island communities also share in the struggle of mitigating marine debris as they work to protect the ocean.

Give Your Heart to the Ocean on Valentine’s Day

Posted Thu, 02/13/2020 - 10:33

Valentine’s Day is a day all about showing your love and appreciation. At the NOAA Marine Debris Program, there’s nothing that we are more grateful for than the tremendous resources our ocean and Great Lakes have to offer. From giving us good food, a place to play, and the oxygen we breathe, these spectacular environments make the perfect Valentine every year.

Source-to-Sea, Addressing Marine Debris in California

Posted Mon, 01/27/2020 - 10:02

California is home to 12% of the nation’s population, with 26 million people living in counties along its 3,427 mile coastline. The average American generates an average of 4.5 lbs of trash per day (EPA estimate as of 2017) multiplied by 26 million people, that's 117,000,000 lbs of trash generated just from California's coastal population for one day! Inevitably some portion of that waste is littered, lost, or “leaked” through waste management and can eventually reach California’s coastal ocean and become marine debris.

Back to School - Keeping Lunches Debris Free

Posted Tue, 08/06/2019 - 14:57

No matter where you live, your daily decisions can have a meaningful impact on the Great Lakes, waterways, and ocean near you. Everyday trash can travel from a landlocked state, down a storm drain, into a river, and out to sea. According to the International Coastal Cleanup report of 2018, items such as food wrappers, straws, and plastic take out containers all made the “top ten items collected” during last year’s cleanup. What do all of these items have in common and how can we help to lessen the amount collected? One place to start is with school lunches.