Large Debris Creates Large Problems

Posted Tue, 07/17/2018 - 19:06

The presence of marine debris creates numerous problems for the environment, marine life, and humans. Large marine debris presents its own unique challenges, threatening the ocean, coasts, and waterways by obstructing navigational channels, causing harm to important habitat, and diminishing commercial and recreational activities. Removing large debris requires significant financial and technical resources.

Fireworks Should Leave Memories, Not Trash

Posted Tue, 07/03/2018 - 08:58

Setting off and enjoying fireworks to celebrate the Fourth of July is a beloved pastime. During this holiday, the skies light up in brilliant colors and designs, leaving us mesmerized and in awe. Whether lighting up sparklers at home or watching a large colorful aerial production, all fireworks leave behind more than memories, they also result in trash. 

Clean Beaches for All

Posted Fri, 06/29/2018 - 16:48

As much as we enjoy beaches for swimming, picnics, and fun in the sun, they are also home to diverse marine and land animals. The Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument, is the largest fully protected marine conservation area on the planet. Its shores and land provide an important habitat to many unique animals. The Monument is home to a total of 23 species that are listed under the U.S. Endangered Species Act, including the threatened Hawaiian Green Sea Turtle, endangered Hawaiian monk seal, and the critically endangered Laysan Duck.

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The Results are in for the Status of Marine Debris on U.S. Shorelines!

Posted Wed, 06/27/2018 - 16:31

Have you ever wondered how much marine debris is on the shoreline of the United States, or what areas of the country have the most debris? What about the most common types of debris in different regions of the United States? These are a few of the questions that were answered by analyzing data from the Ocean Conservancy’s 30-year International Coastal Cleanup, as well as five years’ worth of data from NOAA's Marine Debris Monitoring and Assessment Project.  The NOAA Marine Debris Program funded a rigorous statistical analysis of both datasets performed by the Ocean Conservancy (OC), together with the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO). We are now pleased to share these exciting results!

What Goes Up, Must Come Down!

Posted Tue, 06/26/2018 - 20:37

The summer is a celebratory time when people gather for graduations, the Fourth of July, weddings, and to enjoy time at the beach. Balloons are often used during these special occasions as decorations and gifts, and are sometimes intentionally released into the air. Unfortunately, once they go up, they must also come down; balloons that are released into the air don’t just go away. There are many decoration alternatives to balloons, such as fabric bunting, lights, paper streamers, plants, and reusable ornaments, which add some flare to any celebration!

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California Ocean Litter Prevention Strategy: Addressing Marine Debris from Source to Sea

Posted Mon, 06/18/2018 - 11:00

By: Sherry Lippiatt, California Regional Coordinator for the NOAA Marine Debris Program

The NOAA Marine Debris Program (MDP) and California Ocean Protection Council (OPC) are pleased to announce the 2018 California Ocean Litter Prevention Strategy: Addressing Marine Debris from Source to Sea (Strategy). The Strategy identifies a broad range of actions aimed at preventing and reducing marine debris in California, and is the result of a wide range of input from government partners, non-governmental organizations, industry, and academics working to address the issue. The document provides a roadmap for action over the next six years, and is intended to increase collaboration and galvanize support for marine debris projects.