Removing Typhoon Debris From Land and Sea in the CNMI Shanelle.Naone Thu, 02/16/2023 - 11:00

More than four years after the destructive forces of Typhoon Yutu ripped through Tinian and Saipan, its remnants continue to degrade natural habitats and attractions that jeopardize tourism and economic growth in the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI). The Mariana Islands Nature Alliance and its partners are continuing marine debris removal activities and marine habitat restoration in the waters and surrounding coastal areas of Tinian Harbor, northern coastal areas, and along Saipan’s southern shallow waters and coastlines.

New Report: Recycling Opportunities for Abandoned, Derelict, and End-of-Life Recreational Vessels

Posted Wed, 02/08/2023 - 11:00

The NOAA Marine Debris Program is pleased to share a report on Recycling Opportunities for Abandoned, Derelict, and End-of-Life Recreational Vessels. Section 136 of the Save Our Seas 2.0 Act (P.L. 116-224) required a study to determine the feasibility of developing a nationwide vessel recycling program, using a pilot project in Rhode Island as a model. The report was created by the Rhode Island Marine Trades Association Foundation, in partnership with the NOAA Marine Debris Program and National Marine Sanctuary Foundation, in order to summarize that study.

Meeting the Marine Debris Problem with Perseverance in the Pacific

Posted Wed, 02/01/2023 - 11:00

Marine debris of all types continue to be a problem for island communities across the Pacific. Derelict fishing gear entangles important wildlife and damages coral reefs. Despite the marine debris problem in the Pacific, dedicated organizations and ocean stewards are working on projects to remove derelict fishing gear, clean up typhoon debris, offer alternatives to commonly used single-use plastic items, and much more. The NOAA Marine Debris Program is proud to support these partners and projects throughout the Pacific Islands region.

Reducing Single-Use Plastics on College Campuses

Posted Mon, 01/30/2023 - 11:00

Eckerd College, located along the sunny coast of the Gulf of Mexico, has been working hard to reduce single-use plastic consumption on campus for years. Following a successful NOAA Marine Debris Program prevention grant focused on reducing single-use plastic at Eckerd, the Reduce Single-Use Project teamed up with the University of North Florida in Jacksonville. On both campuses the team has encouraged college students to rely less on plastics through events, beach cleanups, and even an app.

The NOAA Marine Debris Program 2022 Accomplishments Report is Now Available!

Posted Thu, 01/26/2023 - 11:00

The NOAA Marine Debris Program is proud to present our 2022 Accomplishments Report. The report is a snapshot of the work of the Marine Debris Program and our partners throughout the fiscal year. Although the problem of marine debris continues to present challenges for wildlife, habitats, and people across the United States and around the world, the community working to solve this global problem is stronger than ever. We are proud to be a part of this community and contribute to solutions as the United States Government’s lead on the issue of marine debris.

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Traveling Marine Debris Tournament Making a Big Impact

Posted Wed, 01/25/2023 - 11:00

Since our very first event in St. Petersburg, Florida, the Ocean Aid 360 Ghost Trap Rodeo, which resembles an all-ages fishing tournament with prizes, has engaged 1,085 volunteers in 22 events, from the Florida Panhandle to Key West and the Bahamas. Over that time, these participating boaters, anglers, paddlers, and beachcombers have helped Ocean Aid 360 find and remove over 162,000 pounds of marine debris, including 2,591 derelict crab and lobster traps left abandoned during seasonal closures.

New Year, Same Goal: A Debris Free Florida

Posted Wed, 01/04/2023 - 11:00

Florida is unique as the only state that borders both the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. No matter where you are in the state, you’re never more than 60 miles from the nearest body of water. It also means that the daily choices and activities of Florida’s residents and visitors can easily lead to debris in our coastal and marine habitats. Luckily, our partners across the region are kicking off the New Year with renewed energy and effort in leading marine debris removal and prevention projects to keep Florida’s waters healthy and free of debris.

2022 Hurricane Response Marine Debris Removal Fund Awards

Posted Tue, 12/13/2022 - 11:00

Following a competitive review process, the NOAA Marine Debris Program and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation are pleased to announce the five recipients of the 2022 Hurricane Response Marine Debris Removal Fund. The awards will go to Gulf of Mexico states impacted by the 2020 and 2021 hurricane seasons, totaling approximately $1.6 million in federal funds. Federal funding is supplemented by grantee matching contributions, bringing the total investment of these marine debris projects to approximately $2.4 million.