Posts tagged with

removal

Together Apart for the 2020 International Coastal Cleanup

Posted Mon, 09/14/2020 - 11:00

It’s almost that time of year—time for the 35th annual International Coastal Cleanup! The Ocean Conservancy brings people together around the globe for this event to clean up marine debris in their local communities, and the NOAA Marine Debris Program is proud to have supported the International Coastal Cleanup for 14 years. Things may be different this year, but we can still make an impact on our community and our ocean when we work apart and together to clean up and protect our ocean, coasts, and Great Lakes.

The NOAA Marine Debris Program Awards Funding to 23 New Projects

Posted Wed, 08/26/2020 - 11:00

Following a highly competitive review process, the NOAA Marine Debris Program is pleased to announce the 23 recipients of our 2020 Removal and Prevention Grant awards totaling approximately $2.7 million in federal funds. Federal funding is matched by non-federal contributions, bringing the total investment of these marine debris projects to approximately $5.9 million. 

Now Open: FY 2021 Grant Opportunity for Marine Debris Removal Projects

Posted Tue, 07/14/2020 - 08:53

The NOAA Marine Debris Program is proud to announce our FY 2021 Marine Debris Removal notice of funding opportunity. Projects awarded through the removal grant competition will create long-term, quantifiable ecological habitat improvements for NOAA trust resources, with priority consideration for efforts targeting derelict fishing gear, abandoned and derelict vessels, and other medium- and large-scale debris.

The Economic Benefits of Marine Debris Prevention and Removal

Posted Tue, 07/07/2020 - 11:32

Marine debris can be dangerous for wildlife, damage sensitive habitats, and create safety and navigation hazards. But did you know that marine debris can also hurt the economies of coastal communities and decrease commercial fishing revenue? Marine debris can keep tourists away from beaches, compete with active fishing gear and reduce commercial catches, and cost small businesses money.

How Currents Carry Marine Debris to the Hawaiian Islands jennifer.simms Mon, 07/06/2020 - 10:45

Imagine that you are watching a small paper boat float on a lake and suddenly a breeze pushes the boat all the way across to the other side. You can no longer see it and the boat is too far away to pick up and you consider it lost. Now imagine that the paper boat is a large commercial fishing net, and instead of a lake, it’s traveling on currents in the ocean. It too has moved away from its original location, moved out into the open ocean, and is considered lost or derelict. Marine debris of all sizes can move around the ocean, being pushed around by wind and currents, and traveling to far off locations, such as the Hawaiian Islands.

 

Bringing Back the Turtles in Biscayne Bay Florida

Posted Mon, 06/15/2020 - 09:32

Sea turtles are well adapted to life in the ocean and live in tropical and subtropical ocean waters around the world. Major threats to sea turtles in the United States include damage to their habitats, accidental capture during fishing, and getting tangled in or ingesting marine debris. The NOAA Marine Debris Program collaborates with partners to protect sea turtles by removing marine debris from shorelines.

What Do You Know About Talking Trash?

Posted Wed, 06/10/2020 - 09:50

People all over the world are concerned about marine debris and they would like to know more about it. The NOAA Marine Debris Program’s Communications Team responds to those questions we receive through email, and we’ve seen a trend. Following the National Ocean Services theme of Ocean Trivia for this week, we have created our own marine debris “trivia questions” that we hope you enjoy!

A Picturesque Town Harbor Restored through Marine Debris Removal

Posted Thu, 05/21/2020 - 08:49

A perfect contrast: A once treasured and well-traveled vessel lays on her side along the shore of the Rachel Carson Reserve in Beaufort, North Carolina where wild horses graze, researchers discover, and school children learn about estuaries on nature hikes. Abandoned vessels, some left or forgotten by the owner and others remaining after storms, pose complex legal challenges that are often roadblocks to prevention and removal efforts (Spoiler alert: there is a happy ending for Beaufort, North Carolina!).

 

Mitigating Marine Debris for World Migratory Bird Day

Posted Wed, 05/06/2020 - 13:16

It’s almost World Migratory Bird Day! Coming up on Saturday, May 9, we are working with Environment for the Americas to raise awareness on the importance of migratory bird species and celebrate the ways they connect our world. Unfortunately, the world of birds and people can collide in the ocean and Great Lakes, where marine debris can be found in even the most remote places, including far-off islands where seabirds find shelter and breeding grounds.

 

Keeping Current with Marine Debris in Florida and the Caribbean jennifer.simms Fri, 03/27/2020 - 13:45

The NOAA Marine Debris Program’s Florida and Caribbean region includes the state of Florida and the territories of Puerto Rico and the United States Virgin Islands (USVI; St. Croix, St. John, and St. Thomas). This area is surrounded by clear blue water full of diverse coral reefs, fish, and other marine life. The region is no stranger to tourism, fishing, and natural hazards, such as hurricanes, and each of these events can generate marine debris.