Posts tagged with

removal

Capturing Debris and Inspiring Action Along the Anacostia River neil.mccoy Thu, 12/08/2022 - 11:00

The Anacostia River has a long and important history. Today, the Anacostia River watershed is home to more than 800,000 people, encompassing portions of Washington, DC, and Prince George’s and Montgomery Counties in Maryland. Unfortunately, each year hundreds of tons of trash from surrounding lands makes its way into the river. Nearby communities have been working hard to address this problem, and help guide overall reductions in trash and litter entering the river.

Making Progress on Marine Debris in the Mid-Atlantic neil.mccoy Thu, 12/01/2022 - 11:00

The Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States is a large, dynamic, and diverse place. Home to over 10,000 miles of coastline and spanning from Virginia to New York, it features major metropolitan areas, iconic coastal bays and estuaries, and an incredible array of wildlife and habitats. Unfortunately, seemingly everywhere we turn, marine debris can also be found. Debris litters the Mid-Atlantic waterways and coastlines, entangles and captures wildlife, scars habitats, and harms the regional economy.

Marine Debris Cleanup Efforts in North Carolina Continue Years After Hurricane Florence

Posted Tue, 11/29/2022 - 11:00

Vessel removals are a big part of the ongoing cleanup efforts by the North Carolina Coastal Federation along North Carolina’s coast. Since 2019, nearly 100 abandoned and derelict vessels have been removed, along with tons of marine debris collected by commercial fishers. The total yield is an amazing 1,800 tons, or 3.6 million pounds, of debris cleaned out of coastal waters and habitats. While these removal efforts highlight the significant progress made by the project, marine debris continues to be a problem.

On the Hunt for Derelict Crab Traps in South Carolina Coastal Waters neil.mccoy Wed, 11/16/2022 - 11:00

Crabbing is a popular recreational activity and a valuable commercial industry in South Carolina. Traps become derelict when they are displaced or when their marking buoys are lost from events such as boat strikes, extreme weather, or equipment malfunction. The true number and distribution of derelict crab traps in coastal South Carolina remains unknown. A project led by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources aims to improve our understanding of the impact of derelict fishing gear in South Carolina by mapping intertidal and subtidal areas of four estuaries.

Partners Take On Marine Debris Across the Southeast

Posted Thu, 11/10/2022 - 11:00

Fall has finally arrived here in the Southeast, bringing cooler temperatures after a long, brutally hot summer. Gone (for now) are cleanup days of sweat and sunblock-drenched clothes and bags that stick to your skin. This means tackling marine debris just became a little more enjoyable and a lot less sweaty! While you’re out enjoying these beautiful, crisp days, you may see our partners in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina out and about taking on the marine debris issue head-on. We’re excited to highlight some of their marine debris prevention and removal efforts.

All In: How a Coastal Community in Alaska Comes Together to Tackle Marine Debris

Posted Tue, 10/25/2022 - 11:00

The Aleut Community of Saint Paul Island Tribal Government has been actively tackling marine debris issues over the last two decades to protect the marine ecosystem around St. Paul Island. St. Paul Island is part of the Pribilof Islands, which are centrally situated in the eastern Bering Sea in Alaska. The waters surrounding the Pribilof Islands support globally significant populations of marine mammals and birds, and are also central to some of the most valuable commercial fisheries in the world. The St. Paul Island community comprises approximately 350-400 residents, all of whom are deeply connected to the marine ecosystem and act as critical environmental stewards for their home.

A Different Kind of Remote Work - Zooming in on Marine Debris in Alaska

Posted Wed, 10/05/2022 - 11:00

When people think of Alaska, many images may come to mind: jagged mountains, majestic glaciers, rugged shorelines, rich and diverse wildlife and habitats, and vast wilderness. Its position in the North Pacific makes it home to some of the most productive and critical fisheries in the United States, and the world. This same position, combined with its vast scale, ocean current, wind patterns, and the growing maritime transport and fishing activity in near and distant waters, also means huge amounts of marine debris arrive on Alaskan shorelines every year. Fortunately, there is an active, innovative, and dedicated community of individuals and organizations working on the issue across the state of Alaska, ranging from the islands off of Southeast Alaska north to the Chukchi Sea.

The NOAA Marine Debris Program Awards Funding to 14 New Projects

Posted Wed, 09/28/2022 - 11:00

Following a highly competitive review process, the NOAA Marine Debris Program is pleased to announce the 14 recipients of our 2022 Removal and Prevention Grant awards totaling nearly $3.7 million in federal funds, including funding provided through the United States-Mexico-Canada Agreement Implementation Act. Federal funding is matched by non-federal contributions, bringing the total investment in these marine debris projects to approximately $7.8 million.

Remove, Recycle, Restore: Salish Synergy in the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary

Posted Wed, 08/31/2022 - 11:00

In recent years, increasing amounts of marine debris littering the shores of Washington’s wilderness beaches have caused concern in the conservation community. Salish Synergy: Cross-Border Debris Removal and Recycling, an ambitious new project led by the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation and funded by the NOAA Marine Debris Program, aims to remove 35,000 pounds of marine debris from Washington’s outer coast annually.  

Eliminating Threats of Derelict Crab Pots in Washington’s Salish Sea Shanelle.Naone Wed, 08/10/2022 - 11:00

The wonders of Washington’s Salish Sea are easy to find. A day exploring here can include roaming a shoreline digging for clams while one of the region's many snowcapped mountains loom in the background, catching salmon, pulling up pots full of Dungeness crab, or traversing the majestic San Juan Archipelago. Yet, underneath the waters of the Salish Sea lies a hidden threat to the ecosystem; lost and abandoned fishing nets and crab pots on the seafloor that degrade marine habitat and entangle and capture marine life with no one there to harvest them. Living in this area comes with the responsibility to protect its beauty and the resources it provides.