Posts tagged with

removal

Channeling Conservation in the Channel Islands: One Lobster Trap, Balloon, and Piece of Plastic at a Time

Posted Thu, 06/23/2022 - 17:00

Staff, faculty, and students at California State University Channel Islands (CSUCI) Santa Rosa Island Research Station have been working to monitor and remove marine debris from portions of Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands since 2015. With support from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, over 7,500 pounds of debris have been removed from the islands since 2020. This three-year project is an extension of past research and collaborative efforts of partners across the Channel Islands. CSUCI invited the NOAA Marine Debris Program California Regional Coordinator and the program’s California Sea Grant Extension Fellow for a week-long site visit to remove and assess the amounts, types, and sources of marine debris on Santa Rosa Island.

International Collaboration for a Debris Free Gulf of Maine

Posted Thu, 05/26/2022 - 11:00

The Gulf of Maine, which extends from the Bay of Fundy to Cape Cod Bay, is one of the most dynamic and productive marine ecosystems in the world. With its unique coastal habitats and rich waters, the region supports a variety of wildlife from migratory shorebirds to fish, shellfish, and marine mammals. It also provides valuable economic, cultural, and recreational opportunities for people who call the Gulf of Maine home. Unfortunately, marine debris from human-made materials, such as plastics and derelict fishing gear, can damage ocean and coastal habitat and harm wildlife through entanglement and ingestion.

Special Funding Opportunity: Hurricane Response Marine Debris Removal Fund

Posted Tue, 05/17/2022 - 11:30

We are pleased to announce, with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, a request for proposals under the Hurricane Response Marine Debris Removal Fund is now open through June 29. The program will primarily fund marine debris assessment, removal, restoration, and disposal activities in coastal communities in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and the western Florida Panhandle.

Springing Into Action in the Northeast

Posted Wed, 05/04/2022 - 11:00

As temperatures slowly warm, and the Earth begins to thaw, springtime energy is evident across the Northeast Region. Though planning, cleanups, debris sorting, outreach, and research have been ongoing all winter, the NOAA Marine Debris Program’s grant-funded partners across Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut are ramping up for the summer field season and we have a lot to share!

Caribbean Communities Come Together Against Marine Debris

Posted Tue, 04/26/2022 - 11:00

The picturesque islands in the Caribbean can be considered the perfect dream vacation getaway for many, but this natural paradise isn’t free from the issues of marine debris. Islands in the Caribbean are vulnerable to hurricanes, and communities are often impacted by disaster debris. Other factors, such as a dependence on imported goods and solid waste management challenges, increase the chance of unwanted debris littering their coasts. With the support from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, our partners in the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico are passionately working to remove existing debris, develop strategies to prevent future marine debris, and create tools that empower communities to take local action.

Shining Light on Marine Debris Efforts in the Sunshine State

Posted Tue, 04/05/2022 - 11:00

Florida, also known as the Sunshine State, is home to the only living barrier reef in the continental United States and over 650 miles of scenic coastlines. Unfortunately, underwater debris, such as lost traps and fishing gear, causes damage to these fragile ecosystems and impacts local fishing, tourism, and recreational industries. The NOAA Marine Debris Program and our partners across the state are working on debris removal and prevention efforts to keep these important ecosystems healthy and free of debris.

Preventing Cigarette Litter in San Francisco

Posted Tue, 03/15/2022 - 11:00

Much of San Francisco’s beauty comes from its stunning location, surrounded by the Pacific Ocean and San Francisco Bay. San Francisco is also the second-most densely populated city in the United States and one of the country’s most-visited destinations. With so many people near so much water, the marine environment is especially vulnerable to all forms of human-made pollution, including cigarette butts, the most littered item in San Francisco and around the world.

The Many Hands of California’s Marine Debris Community

Posted Wed, 03/02/2022 - 11:00

About 70% of Californians believe their ocean and beaches are very important to California’s future and report that plastics and marine debris are a big problem on a coast near them. As a result, organizations, individuals, and volunteers from across the state are contributing an enormous and noble amount of time and energy to make California a national leader on addressing and preventing marine debris.

Working Together to Tackle Marine Debris in the Great Lakes

Posted Wed, 02/02/2022 - 11:00

The Great Lakes region, with its beautiful coastlines, diverse wildlife, and stunning vistas is not immune to marine debris concerns. Fortunately, our numerous partners in the region are hard at work addressing the issues of plastics, fishing gear, abandoned and derelict vessels, and other debris that impact the environment.

Clearing the Lady Carolina from Saipan Lagoon

Posted Wed, 01/26/2022 - 11:00

The strongest El Niño episode in the Western Pacific, since the record years of 1997 and 1998, took place in 2015. Micronesia experienced over 30 tropical cyclones, and the chances of typhoons impacting the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands were significantly elevated. After several near-misses, in August 2015 Typhoon Soudelor directly impacted the island of Saipan. In its wake, it caused the initial grounding of the Lady Carolina, an 83-foot, steel-hulled fishing vessel, in Saipan Lagoon.