Posts tagged with

Pacific Northwest

Partnering with Native Communities to Take On Marine Debris

Posted Thu, 11/12/2020 - 10:00

Indigenous communities have a deep understanding of and relationship with the natural environment, which has fostered expert and nuanced traditional ecological knowledge, and shaped cultural practices and identity. NOAA recognizes the importance of indigenous peoples' traditional knowledge for understanding the environment, adapting to environmental change, and improving the health of environments that we all depend on. The Marine Debris Program (MDP) is proud to work with indigenous communities in Alaska and the Pacific Northwest to understand and reduce the impacts of marine debris through projects that prevent and remove marine debris. 

The Washington Coast Five-Year Balloon Project jennifer.simms Mon, 12/23/2019 - 19:19

It is ironic and sad that balloons, meant to convey a message of compassion, love, and best wishes, become anything but when they are lost and become marine debris. Balloons may be ingested by marine animals, their ribbons can entangle marine life, and when they are deposited on the beach, sometimes hundreds or even thousands of miles from where they were first lost, they add to the marine debris burden on the beach ecology.

The Swinomish Indian Tribal Community Marine Debris Removal Project in Similk Bay jennifer.simms Wed, 10/09/2019 - 11:40

It is estimated that every year, over 10,000 crab pots are lost in the Puget Sound. The lost pots trap and kill crabs and other marine animals, degrade the sea floor upon which they rest, and interfere with other fishing.

Updated Oregon Marine Debris Action Plan Released

Posted Thu, 09/19/2019 - 09:02

The NOAA Marine Debris Program (MDP) is pleased to share the biennial update to the 2017-2023 Oregon Marine Debris Action Plan (Action Plan). This document is the result of a collaborative effort between the MDP and regional partners, including representatives from governments, tribes, non-profits, academia, and the private sector. It includes partners’ shared goals, strategies to achieve those goals, and corresponding actions to reduce marine debris in Oregon.

A Big Problem with Many Solutions: Derelict Crab Pots in Washington State

Posted Wed, 07/17/2019 - 09:18

They say that too many cooks spoil the broth, but when the broth is derelict crab pots in Washington State, the more cooks the better. Over 10,000 crab pots are estimated to be lost annually in the Puget Sound alone, and  many more are lost in the Straits of Juan de Fuca and along the Pacific Coast.

Makah Tribe Works to Address Derelict Crab Pots and Lines

Posted Fri, 04/26/2019 - 12:34

Winter storms are fierce and powerful along the coast of the Pacific Northwest, capable of moving fishing gear far from where it was deployed. The peak of the Dungeness crab season is in the dead of winter, coinciding with storm season, a major contributor for gear loss. Lost crab pots and other derelict fishing gear harm the environment, pose a risk to navigation, and negatively impact the economy.

Marine Debris in the Pacific Northwest

Posted Fri, 04/26/2019 - 12:21

To visitors of the Pacific Northwest, beaches along the Pacific Ocean and the Puget Sound seem stunningly beautiful and often pristine. A closer look reveals that these beaches, like beaches the world over, are impacted by marine debris that harms the ecosystem, creates navigational hazards, and negatively affects the economy.

Washington Marine Debris Action Plan Released
Nir Barnea, Pacific Northwest Regional Coordinator for the NOAA Marine Debris Program
alexis.thorbecke Wed, 09/05/2018 - 09:21

The NOAA Marine Debris Program is pleased to share the Washington Marine Debris Action Plan. This document is the result of a productive and collaborative effort between the NOAA Marine Debris Program and regional partners, including over 50 workshop participants, and represents a partner-led effort to guide Washington’s actions on marine debris for the next six years.

50 Cleanups and Counting: A Celebration of Community Dedication krista.e.stegemann Thu, 05/17/2018 - 11:00

By: Nir Barnea, Pacific Northwest Regional Coordinator for the NOAA Marine Debris Program

On April 21, 2018, Earth Day was celebrated with beach cleanups in many places, but for the Grassroots Garbage Gang in Washington State’s Long Beach Peninsula, it was an especially important day— a celebration of the 50th Grassroots Garbage Gang community-organized beach cleanup, representing a remarkable achievement. Beach cleanups on the Long Beach Peninsula began in 1971, when the Pacific Northwest Four Wheel Drive Association, along with support by state agencies and local organizations, started their Shore Patrol and marine debris removal. Around the year 2000, community volunteers formed the Grassroots Garbage Gang and joined the effort to clean up the beautiful Long Beach Peninsula beaches. Organizing three cleanups a year— in January, April (Earth Day), and July 5th– the dedicated volunteers of the Grassroots Garbage Gang have removed hundreds of tons of marine debris over the years. In addition, the group has reached out to the community and visitors with a strong message to prevent marine debris and help reduce it.