Posts tagged with

Gulf of Mexico

Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation’s Derelict Crab Trap Removal Program

Posted Thu, 11/21/2019 - 08:36

The commercial crab fishery in Louisiana is an important fishery that primarily targets adult blue crabs (Callinectes sapidus). Yielding an annual average landing (crabs brought to port) of 18,600,000 kg (41,000,000 pounds) from 2013 to 2017, the Louisiana blue crab fishery is frequently both the largest blue crab fishery and domestic blue crab supplier in the United States.

Estimating the Effects of Marine Debris on Coastal Economies

Posted Wed, 09/25/2019 - 13:14

Imagine you’ve planned a big trip to the beach with your family and friends, loaded up the car with supplies or jumped on a plane, and traveled to your vacation spot, only to find a beach littered with plastic beverage bottles, stray fishing line, chip bags, cigarette butts, and other debris. Would you stay and play, or be on your way? What if there were no debris, would you be more likely to return in the future? These are the kinds of questions we asked to better understand the relationship between marine debris and the coastal tourism economy.

Restoring Fish Habitat on the Pearl River

Posted Thu, 03/07/2019 - 09:15

The Pearl River is one of the most biologically diverse river systems in the Southeast with over 140 fish species and 28 mussel species, making it a high priority for conservation. Overtime the Pearl River, just upstream of Bogalusa, became blocked by an over accumulation of woody debris resulting in part by land use changes and then accelerated through recent hurricanes and flooding events. This project, funded through a NOAA Marine Debris Community-based Removal grant, combines efforts across multiple federal, state, and local agencies, NGOs, corporations, and local communities to restore hydrologic function for important fish species to be able to travel freely upstream to spawn

Marine Debris in the Gulf of Mexico

Posted Wed, 03/06/2019 - 09:17

Thousands of miles of rivers east of the Rocky Mountains flow down the continental US and empty into the warm waters of the Gulf of Mexico. Debris from as far away as Minnesota and Pennsylvania can end up in the waters off the Louisiana or Alabama coast. Preventing and removing debris in the Gulf States can be a huge challenge, but the Marine Debris Program’s partners in the region are up to the task.

Texas Marine Debris Emergency Response Guide: A New Comprehensive Guide for the State

Posted Tue, 12/18/2018 - 08:33

The Marine Debris Program is pleased to release the Texas Marine Debris Emergency Response Guide: Comprehensive Guidance Document, the final emergency response guide for the Gulf of Mexico states. The Texas Guide is a product of a collaborative process with local, state, and federal agencies.  The Guide aims to improve preparedness for response and recovery operations following an acute waterway debris incident in coastal Texas.

NOAA Marine Debris Awards Funding to Clean up Marine Debris in 2017 Hurricane-Affected Areas

Posted Fri, 11/16/2018 - 10:09

With financial support from NOAA’s Marine Debris Program, coastal states and territories impacted by Hurricanes Harvey, Irma, and Maria received $17.2M in disaster relief funding to assess, removal, and dispose of hurricane related marine debris.

Campaign for a “Litter-Free Mardi Gras”

Posted Thu, 02/08/2018 - 11:00

By: Caitlin Wessel, Gulf of Mexico Regional Coordinator for the NOAA Marine Debris Program

Mardi Gras is a fun occasion for many cities across the South, from New Orleans to Alabama. Bead necklaces and other items like moon pies, cups, and cheap toys are a Mardi Gras staple and are thrown to excited crowds lining the streets during parades that begin six weeks before Fat Tuesday. Unfortunately, many of these items are abandoned on the street and can easily wash down street drains and end up in streams, rivers, and eventually the Gulf of Mexico. Learn how our partners are working to reduce the environmental impacts of Mardi Gras while keeping the Mardi Gras spirit alive and well!

Mississippi Coastal Cleanup

Posted Thu, 11/09/2017 - 11:00

By: Amanda Sartain, Extension Program Assistant at Mississippi State University

Since 1988, thousands of Mississippi Coastal Cleanup volunteers have contributed hours of hard work and dedication to the removal of marine debris, which includes any solid, man-made material that ends up in the marine environment either intentionally or unintentionally. Millions of pounds of marine debris have been removed from Mississippi beaches, waterways, and barrier islands over the years. Unsurprisingly, commonly-collected trash items have included cigarette butts, food wrappers, plastic bottles, and straws. During last year’s cleanup event, over 14 tons of trash were collected. Cigarette butts, food wrappers, and plastic beverage bottles were once again among the most common items found. 

The 29th annual Mississippi Coastal Cleanup will take place Saturday, November 18th, from 8 to 11am. Come get involved!