Working Together to Tackle Marine Debris in the Great Lakes

Posted Wed, 02/02/2022 - 11:00

The Great Lakes region, with its beautiful coastlines, diverse wildlife, and stunning vistas is not immune to marine debris concerns. Fortunately, our numerous partners in the region are hard at work addressing the issues of plastics, fishing gear, abandoned and derelict vessels, and other debris that impact the environment.

The 2022 Ohio Marine Debris Art Challenge: How does Marine Debris Impact Lake Erie Wildlife?

Posted Mon, 01/31/2022 - 11:00

In order to help raise awareness of the issue of marine debris in the Great Lakes, we’re excited to be offering the Ohio Marine Debris Art Challenge for students in grades 6-12 in coastal Ohio! After learning about marine debris in the ocean and Great Lakes, and how we all may be contributing with our trash, students will create marine debris artwork from repurposed trash.

Clearing the Lady Carolina from Saipan Lagoon

Posted Wed, 01/26/2022 - 11:00

The strongest El Niño episode in the Western Pacific, since the record years of 1997 and 1998, took place in 2015. Micronesia experienced over 30 tropical cyclones, and the chances of typhoons impacting the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands were significantly elevated. After several near-misses, in August 2015 Typhoon Soudelor directly impacted the island of Saipan. In its wake, it caused the initial grounding of the Lady Carolina, an 83-foot, steel-hulled fishing vessel, in Saipan Lagoon. 

The NOAA Marine Debris Program 2021 Accomplishments Report is Now Available!

Posted Wed, 01/12/2022 - 11:00

The NOAA Marine Debris Program is proud to present our 2021 Accomplishments Report. Once a year, we like to take a moment to reflect on our Program’s mission to investigate and prevent the adverse impacts of marine debris, and to recognize the achievements made by our team and our partners. Despite continued obstacles during this difficult period, the NOAA Marine Debris Program and partners adapted and expanded our efforts to achieve the ambitious goals set in our new strategic plan.

Tags

Small Communities with Large Efforts to Prevent and Remove Marine Debris

Posted Tue, 12/28/2021 - 14:55

The NOAA Marine Debris Program’s Pacific Islands Region of American Samoa, Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, and Hawai‘i spans across 5,239,989 square miles, and is our largest region. Despite their geographic isolation, these island communities are not isolated from the issue of marine debris. Island communities face unique challenges around managing marine debris, including limited land mass, waste infrastructure, and currents that carry debris from afar. Five marine debris prevention and removal projects supported by the NOAA Marine Debris Program are in progress in the Pacific Islands Region. These small communities are leading the way with large efforts.

Clearing Derelict Fishing Gear from Artificial Reefs in Florida's Charlotte Harbor

Posted Tue, 12/21/2021 - 11:00

Florida’s Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) recently completed a marine debris removal project with the support of a Fishing for Energy grant, a partnership between the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, the NOAA Marine Debris Program, Covanta, and Schnitzer Steel. Florida's DEP and their partners worked to locate and remove derelict fishing gear and other marine debris from four artificial reefs in the Charlotte Harbor Aquatic Preserves on the southwest coast of Florida.

2021 Hawai‘i Marine Debris Action Plan Released

Posted Wed, 12/08/2021 - 11:00

The NOAA Marine Debris Program is pleased to share the 2021 Hawai‘i Marine Debris Action Plan. This document is the result of a collaborative effort between the MDP and partners across Hawai‘i, including federal, state, and local governments, nongovernmental organizations, industry, and academia. It represents a partner-led effort to guide marine debris actions in Hawai‘i for the next ten years.

The Makah Tribe Meets the Challenge of Marine Debris

Posted Tue, 11/23/2021 - 23:31

Native Americans have lived on these lands since time immemorial. Their roots are deeply embedded in the land, waters, and genealogy of this place. During National Native American Heritage Month we celebrate the countless contributions of Native peoples, their important history, present perseverance, and future. The NOAA Marine Debris Program is proud to work with indigenous communities in stewardship efforts that help to understand and reduce the impacts of marine debris. One such project, with the Makah Tribe, focused on the removal of derelict fishing gear within the Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary, along the northwest corner of the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State and the Makah Tribe’s Usual and Accustomed Fishing Area.