New Year, Same Goal: A Debris Free Florida

Posted Wed, 01/04/2023 - 11:00

Florida is unique as the only state that borders both the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. No matter where you are in the state, you’re never more than 60 miles from the nearest body of water. It also means that the daily choices and activities of Florida’s residents and visitors can easily lead to debris in our coastal and marine habitats. Luckily, our partners across the region are kicking off the New Year with renewed energy and effort in leading marine debris removal and prevention projects to keep Florida’s waters healthy and free of debris.

2022 Hurricane Response Marine Debris Removal Fund Awards neil.mccoy Tue, 12/13/2022 - 11:00

Following a competitive review process, the NOAA Marine Debris Program and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation are pleased to announce the five recipients of the 2022 Hurricane Response Marine Debris Removal Fund. The awards will go to Gulf of Mexico states impacted by the 2020 and 2021 hurricane seasons, totaling approximately $1.6 million in federal funds. Federal funding is supplemented by grantee matching contributions, bringing the total investment of these marine debris projects to approximately $2.4 million. 

Mapping, Marking, and Mobilizing to Remove Derelict Fishing Gear from Delaware’s Inland Bays

Posted Mon, 12/12/2022 - 11:00

The shallow, protected habitats of Delaware’s Inland Bays make for one of the most popular areas in the state for residents and tourists to try their hands at catching blue crabs. In boats or on the shore, recreational crabbers use all kinds of gear, from hand lines, to trot lines, to small traps with collapsible sides, and the Chesapeake style crab pot. Unfortunately, thousands of derelict crab pots have been left behind or lost, and are littered beneath the surface of the Inland Bays. The University of Delaware and Delaware Sea Grant, with funding from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, worked to address the issue by teaming up with recreational crabbers to remove derelict pots.

Capturing Debris and Inspiring Action Along the Anacostia River neil.mccoy Thu, 12/08/2022 - 11:00

The Anacostia River has a long and important history. Today, the Anacostia River watershed is home to more than 800,000 people, encompassing portions of Washington, DC, and Prince George’s and Montgomery Counties in Maryland. Unfortunately, each year hundreds of tons of trash from surrounding lands makes its way into the river. Nearby communities have been working hard to address this problem, and help guide overall reductions in trash and litter entering the river.

Making Progress on Marine Debris in the Mid-Atlantic

Posted Thu, 12/01/2022 - 11:00

The Mid-Atlantic coast of the United States is a large, dynamic, and diverse place. Home to over 10,000 miles of coastline and spanning from Virginia to New York, it features major metropolitan areas, iconic coastal bays and estuaries, and an incredible array of wildlife and habitats. Unfortunately, seemingly everywhere we turn, marine debris can also be found. Debris litters the Mid-Atlantic waterways and coastlines, entangles and captures wildlife, scars habitats, and harms the regional economy.

Marine Debris Cleanup Efforts in North Carolina Continue Years After Hurricane Florence

Posted Tue, 11/29/2022 - 11:00

Vessel removals are a big part of the ongoing cleanup efforts by the North Carolina Coastal Federation along North Carolina’s coast. Since 2019, nearly 100 abandoned and derelict vessels have been removed, along with tons of marine debris collected by commercial fishers. The total yield is an amazing 1,800 tons, or 3.6 million pounds, of debris cleaned out of coastal waters and habitats. While these removal efforts highlight the significant progress made by the project, marine debris continues to be a problem.

On the Hunt for Derelict Crab Traps in South Carolina Coastal Waters

Posted Wed, 11/16/2022 - 11:00

Crabbing is a popular recreational activity and a valuable commercial industry in South Carolina. Traps become derelict when they are displaced or when their marking buoys are lost from events such as boat strikes, extreme weather, or equipment malfunction. The true number and distribution of derelict crab traps in coastal South Carolina remains unknown. A project led by the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources aims to improve our understanding of the impact of derelict fishing gear in South Carolina by mapping intertidal and subtidal areas of four estuaries.

From Fellowship to Fellow Teammate! Shanelle.Naone Tue, 11/15/2022 - 11:00

In 2020, I began my California Sea Grant Extension Fellowship with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Marine Debris Program. I was brought on to help the California Regional Coordinator implement marine debris projects and strategies in California. Over the course of my fellowship, I had the opportunity to lead a statewide marine debris action plan, support strategic internal efforts, and partake in countless professional development opportunities. This experience has improved my confidence as a young professional, guided my career path, and has certainly prepared me for my next chapter and future career.