Posts tagged with

Southeast

North Carolina Mounts Statewide Effort to Remove Abandoned and Derelict Vessels

Posted Thu, 06/17/2021 - 11:00

For the first time ever, North Carolina is mounting a comprehensive effort to address and remove abandoned and derelict vessels that blight the coast, pose navigational hazards, and degrade important coastal habitats. The North Carolina Coastal Federation is partnering with the NOAA Marine Debris Program and other federal, state, and local partners to take the first important steps to document and remove these vessels.

Protecting Marine Wildlife and Coastal Habitats in the Southeast

Posted Mon, 06/14/2021 - 11:00

Summer is almost here, or already here if you live in the Southeast, and that means fun in the sun, ice-cold lemonade, and big hair (thanks a lot, humidity!). With more people out and about, that can also mean more marine debris on our sandy beaches and expansive meandering marshes. Fortunately, our partners in Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina are tackling the marine debris issue head on through prevention and removal efforts, and we’re excited to highlight some of those efforts this week.

Locations and Languages: Marine Debris Curricula and Resources from Near and Far

Posted Wed, 08/05/2020 - 11:00

As students and teachers prepare for a new year of learning, we are sharing educational marine debris resources that highlight the problem in different locations and different languages. Marine debris is a constant and challenging threat to communities all over the world. It can travel on currents across the ocean, reach remote shorelines where very few people live, and cause major problems for both people and wildlife. No matter where you live, it's important for us all to understand the problem.

Turtle Trash Collectors Goes Virtual!

Posted Tue, 07/21/2020 - 10:51

Many things look different in our world right now: most people are working from home, our favorite restaurants and beaches are closed, and students finished off the school year online. So, where does that leave Turtle Trash Collectors, a University of North Carolina Wilmington MarineQuest outreach program funded by the NOAA Marine Debris Program?

The Economic Benefits of Marine Debris Prevention and Removal

Posted Tue, 07/07/2020 - 11:32

Marine debris can be dangerous for wildlife, damage sensitive habitats, and create safety and navigation hazards. But did you know that marine debris can also hurt the economies of coastal communities and decrease commercial fishing revenue? Marine debris can keep tourists away from beaches, compete with active fishing gear and reduce commercial catches, and cost small businesses money.

A Picturesque Town Harbor Restored through Marine Debris Removal

Posted Thu, 05/21/2020 - 08:49

A perfect contrast: A once treasured and well-traveled vessel lays on her side along the shore of the Rachel Carson Reserve in Beaufort, North Carolina where wild horses graze, researchers discover, and school children learn about estuaries on nature hikes. Abandoned vessels, some left or forgotten by the owner and others remaining after storms, pose complex legal challenges that are often roadblocks to prevention and removal efforts (Spoiler alert: there is a happy ending for Beaufort, North Carolina!).

 

2019 Hurricane Response Marine Debris Removal Fund Awards

Posted Mon, 03/09/2020 - 13:17

Following a competitive review process, the NOAA Marine Debris Program and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation are pleased to announce the six recipients of the 2019 Hurricane Response Marine Debris Removal Fund. The funds will go to coastal states and territories impacted by Hurricanes Florence and Michael, and Typhoon Yutu, totaling approximately $8.2 million in federal funds. Federal funding is supplemented by grantee matching contributions, bringing the total investment of these marine debris projects to approximately $8.6 million.

Watermen Assist Hurricane Recovery with Marine Debris Removal in North Carolina

Posted Thu, 12/12/2019 - 16:57

On a recent cool foggy morning near Surf City, North Carolina, Joe Huie stepped out of his skiff, trudged through the marsh, and up to a small hammock. Hoping he wouldn’t see what he knew would be there, he gazed out over the marsh dotted with small spider webs glistening with the morning fog and dew. Soon, Joe could pick out the telltale signs of the pieces of docks, polystyrene, and other hurricane debris that littered the beautiful marsh.

Partners Tackle Marine Debris in their Southeast Stomping Grounds

Posted Thu, 12/12/2019 - 14:24

The NOAA Marine Debris Program’s Southeast region, which spans Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina, includes gorgeous sandy beaches, expansive meandering marshlands, diverse wildlife, significant history, and lots of southern charm. While sweet tea, hospitality, downhome sayings, and “y’all” are signatures of the south, so too are issues with marine debris.

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