Posts tagged with

prevention

From Ridge to Reef: Protecting Guam’s Marine Life Through Student Efforts

Posted Wed, 09/21/2022 - 11:00

With its crystal clear waters and rich coral reefs, Guam is undoubtedly a hidden paradise in the Pacific ocean. It is home to five protected marine preserves teeming with aquatic animals and plants. Everything on the island is connected, from the mountain ridges to the lively reefs, meaning that even the tiniest actions can offset the entire ecosystem. The Ocean Guardian School project at Simon A. Sanchez High School worked together with five other schools across the island to minimize impacts on the ecosystem and reduce potential sources of marine debris.

Expanding Nurdle Patrol from Texas to Mexico

Posted Thu, 08/25/2022 - 11:00

Small plastic pellets, or nurdles, are the raw material for almost everything made of plastic. Unfortunately, before they make it to plastic production, they can be released into the environment where they pollute habitats and harm wildlife. With a grant from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, Nurdle Patrol, a citizen science project run by the Mission-Aransas National Estuarine Research Reserve at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute in Port Aransas, Texas, is expanding efforts throughout Mexico.

Protecting Pacific Northwest Shorelines: A Committed Community

Posted Wed, 08/03/2022 - 11:00

Oregon and Washington contain some of the most remote and ecologically diverse coasts in the continental United States. These waters teem with fish and marine mammals, and support tourism and vital subsistence, commercial, and recreational fisheries. Marine debris can be harmful to these waters and all that rely on it. These threats could be derelict fishing gear that entangles and catches marine life, or it could also be large debris such as derelict vessels that have sunk or been improperly disposed of. The NOAA Marine Debris Program partners with community members and organizations in the Pacific Northwest who are committed to preventing and removing these and other types of marine debris.

Taking on Debris Big and Small in the Gulf of Mexico

Posted Wed, 07/13/2022 - 11:00

The Gulf of Mexico is a vast and productive body of water spanning 600,000 square miles with tremendous ecological, economic, and social value. The vast Gulf provides essential habitat for an amazing diversity of fish, whales, dolphins, and species of migratory, wading, and sea birds. Unfortunately, marine debris impacts habitats, wildlife, and industries throughout the Gulf of Mexico. In order to address the issue of marine debris, from large hurricane debris to tiny microplastics, the region needs a comprehensive approach that brings together many partners.

International Collaboration for a Debris Free Gulf of Maine

Posted Thu, 05/26/2022 - 11:00

The Gulf of Maine, which extends from the Bay of Fundy to Cape Cod Bay, is one of the most dynamic and productive marine ecosystems in the world. With its unique coastal habitats and rich waters, the region supports a variety of wildlife from migratory shorebirds to fish, shellfish, and marine mammals. It also provides valuable economic, cultural, and recreational opportunities for people who call the Gulf of Maine home. Unfortunately, marine debris from human-made materials, such as plastics and derelict fishing gear, can damage ocean and coastal habitat and harm wildlife through entanglement and ingestion.

Springing Into Action in the Northeast

Posted Wed, 05/04/2022 - 11:00

As temperatures slowly warm, and the Earth begins to thaw, springtime energy is evident across the Northeast Region. Though planning, cleanups, debris sorting, outreach, and research have been ongoing all winter, the NOAA Marine Debris Program’s grant-funded partners across Maine, New Hampshire, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, and Connecticut are ramping up for the summer field season and we have a lot to share!

Caribbean Communities Come Together Against Marine Debris

Posted Tue, 04/26/2022 - 11:00

The picturesque islands in the Caribbean can be considered the perfect dream vacation getaway for many, but this natural paradise isn’t free from the issues of marine debris. Islands in the Caribbean are vulnerable to hurricanes, and communities are often impacted by disaster debris. Other factors, such as a dependence on imported goods and solid waste management challenges, increase the chance of unwanted debris littering their coasts. With the support from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, our partners in the U.S. Virgin Islands and Puerto Rico are passionately working to remove existing debris, develop strategies to prevent future marine debris, and create tools that empower communities to take local action.

Shining Light on Marine Debris Efforts in the Sunshine State

Posted Tue, 04/05/2022 - 11:00

Florida, also known as the Sunshine State, is home to the only living barrier reef in the continental United States and over 650 miles of scenic coastlines. Unfortunately, underwater debris, such as lost traps and fishing gear, causes damage to these fragile ecosystems and impacts local fishing, tourism, and recreational industries. The NOAA Marine Debris Program and our partners across the state are working on debris removal and prevention efforts to keep these important ecosystems healthy and free of debris.

Preventing Cigarette Litter in San Francisco

Posted Tue, 03/15/2022 - 11:00

Much of San Francisco’s beauty comes from its stunning location, surrounded by the Pacific Ocean and San Francisco Bay. San Francisco is also the second-most densely populated city in the United States and one of the country’s most-visited destinations. With so many people near so much water, the marine environment is especially vulnerable to all forms of human-made pollution, including cigarette butts, the most littered item in San Francisco and around the world.

The Many Hands of California’s Marine Debris Community

Posted Wed, 03/02/2022 - 11:00

About 70% of Californians believe their ocean and beaches are very important to California’s future and report that plastics and marine debris are a big problem on a coast near them. As a result, organizations, individuals, and volunteers from across the state are contributing an enormous and noble amount of time and energy to make California a national leader on addressing and preventing marine debris.