Posts tagged with

removal

Rewriting the All Too Common Story of Abandoned and Derelict Vessels

Posted Thu, 06/03/2021 - 11:00

Abandoned and derelict vessels are a common story and the all-too-common ending is that  marinas end up burdened with the responsibility for them. The longer they sit, the more they deteriorate, taking up valuable space and becoming a safety hazard. Despite the best of intentions, many boats can end up as abandoned and derelict vessels in our coastal, estuarine, and river environments. With the help of the NOAA Marine Debris Program removal grant and partnerships with marinas in the Certified Clean Marina Program, the Oregon State Marine Board hopes to interrupt this common narrative.

Cascadia Cleanup: A Community Response to Marine Debris in the Pacific Northwest

Posted Tue, 06/01/2021 - 11:00

The coastal waters of the Pacific Northwest are known for their combination of remote beauty and rich marine life, providing the foundation for multiple industries. This unique area spans over 4,400 miles of coastline and falls within the Cascadia bioregion. Despite all this natural beauty, lurking below the waves and along the rocky and sandy shores of Oregon and Washington a common issue can be found: marine debris. Thankfully, our partners in the Pacific Northwest are working hard every day to address marine debris through prevention, research, removal, and collaboration.

Home is Where the Ocean is Healthy: A Community-based Approach to Addressing Marine Debris

Posted Thu, 05/27/2021 - 11:00

Located in the middle of the North Pacific Ocean, the Hawaiian Archipelago is surrounded by thousands of miles of vast blue ocean. Hawai‘i’s crystal clear waters and landscapes are home to over 9,000 endemic species, making it one of the most biodiverse regions on the planet. Hawai`i’s marine animals face increasing threats from human activities and Hawaii Marine Animal Response works daily with NOAA, the State of Hawaii, and other partners to conserve protected marine animals and reduce threats to their survival.

Protecting the Pacific Through Resiliency and Creativity

Posted Mon, 05/24/2021 - 11:00

The Pacific Ocean’s vast size and resources have brought those who call it home great abundance and a high level of resiliency. Today, these island communities rely on their resiliency to confront the issue of marine debris in an effort to protect the Pacific. Using community-based and creative approaches, dedicated organizations in the Commonwealth of the Northern Marianas Islands, Guam, American Samoa, and Hawai‘i are working to protect and restore marine habitats, prevent marine debris through product research and design, and mitigate the effects of derelict fishing gear on endangered and threatened species with the support of the NOAA Marine Debris Program. 

Awaiting Rescue in Delaware – Recovering Derelict Crab Pots from Delaware’s Inland Bays

Posted Tue, 05/18/2021 - 11:00

Up to 20,000 pots from Delaware’s recreational blue crab fishery may sit on the murky bottom of Delaware’s Inland Bays, getting swept around by the currents and mired in the mud. There, they await rescue – inadvertently scraping across the bottom, getting in the way of boats, and continuing to ghost fish by trapping crabs, fish, and other wildlife. A new project, led by the University of Delaware and Delaware Sea Grant, is using side-scan and live sonar to identify and recover derelict crab pots lost and abandoned in Delaware’s Indian River Bay.

Mobilizing Against Marine Debris in the Mid-Atlantic Region

Posted Mon, 05/17/2021 - 11:00

The Mid-Atlantic region is home to diverse industries, large urban cities, and beaches popular for tourism. Our partners are working hard to keep the coast clean to conserve all that we love about the Mid-Atlantic. Seven prevention and removal projects supported by the NOAA Marine Debris Program are currently underway in the Mid-Atlantic, spanning issues from single-use plastics and consumer debris, to abandoned and derelict fishing gear and vessels.

Reduction of Ghost Fishing from Derelict Blue Crab Traps on the Mid-Texas Coast

Posted Wed, 05/05/2021 - 11:00

Most of us in coastal communities know the term “ghost fishing” and why it is bad, but to get a handle on the problem here in the Texas Mid-Coast area local scientists are diving deeper into the issue by looking for the root causes of the problem. The Coastal Bend Bays & Estuaries Program, with funding from a NOAA Marine Debris Program removal grant, is expanding efforts to remove derelict traps and gather standardized data that can be used to better assess the ecological and economic impacts and help identify the causes of trap abandonment.

Addressing Marine Debris Issues Across the Gulf of Mexico

Posted Tue, 05/04/2021 - 11:00

The Gulf of Mexico’s coastal habitats are a treasure trove of biological diversity and unique ecosystems. They’re also a vital resource for coastal economies, industries, and communities, and are impacted by human activity in many ways. One ongoing challenge in the Gulf of Mexico region is the problem of marine debris. From local litter and abandoned fishing gear, to restaurant waste and debris dams, marine debris in the Gulf States is a complex issue. Fortunately, our partners in the region are up for the challenge and are leading efforts to prevent and remove debris across the Gulf.

California Dreams Become Reality

Posted Tue, 04/27/2021 - 11:00

There’s an old saying that good things come in threes. This holds true for many things, including the fight against marine debris. Strategies to address this issue can be divided into three approaches: 1) reduce waste right at the source, 2) collect trash before it gets into the water, and 3) clean up trash from our shorelines. In California, innovative ways to tackle the issue of waste in our waterways fall within each of these categories, helping to make dreams of cleaner beaches a reality.

The Tide is Turning on Marine Debris in the U.S. Virgin Islands

Posted Thu, 03/25/2021 - 11:00

An island in the middle of the Caribbean Sea is an idyllic place to live and visit, but islands can be particularly vulnerable to marine debris. The effects of marine debris can be seen in everyday life in the U.S. Virgin Islands, from the visible debris on our beaches, to the economic toll that it can take on our tourism industry. To help address the issue, the University of the Virgin Islands is leading efforts to remove marine debris from sensitive mangrove habitats and coordinate action with stakeholders across the territory.