Meeting the Marine Debris Problem with Perseverance in the Pacific

Posted Wed, 02/01/2023 - 11:00

Marine debris of all types continue to be a problem for island communities across the Pacific. Derelict fishing gear entangles important wildlife and damages coral reefs. Despite the marine debris problem in the Pacific, dedicated organizations and ocean stewards are working on projects to remove derelict fishing gear, clean up typhoon debris, offer alternatives to commonly used single-use plastic items, and much more. The NOAA Marine Debris Program is proud to support these partners and projects throughout the Pacific Islands region.

Reducing Single-Use Plastics on College Campuses

Posted Mon, 01/30/2023 - 11:00

Eckerd College, located along the sunny coast of the Gulf of Mexico, has been working hard to reduce single-use plastic consumption on campus for years. Following a successful NOAA Marine Debris Program prevention grant focused on reducing single-use plastic at Eckerd, the Reduce Single-Use Project teamed up with the University of North Florida in Jacksonville. On both campuses the team has encouraged college students to rely less on plastics through events, beach cleanups, and even an app.

The NOAA Marine Debris Program 2022 Accomplishments Report is Now Available!

Posted Thu, 01/26/2023 - 11:00

The NOAA Marine Debris Program is proud to present our 2022 Accomplishments Report. The report is a snapshot of the work of the Marine Debris Program and our partners throughout the fiscal year. Although the problem of marine debris continues to present challenges for wildlife, habitats, and people across the United States and around the world, the community working to solve this global problem is stronger than ever. We are proud to be a part of this community and contribute to solutions as the United States Government’s lead on the issue of marine debris.

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Traveling Marine Debris Tournament Making a Big Impact

Posted Wed, 01/25/2023 - 11:00

Since our very first event in St. Petersburg, Florida, the Ocean Aid 360 Ghost Trap Rodeo, which resembles an all-ages fishing tournament with prizes, has engaged 1,085 volunteers in 22 events, from the Florida Panhandle to Key West and the Bahamas. Over that time, these participating boaters, anglers, paddlers, and beachcombers have helped Ocean Aid 360 find and remove over 162,000 pounds of marine debris, including 2,591 derelict crab and lobster traps left abandoned during seasonal closures.

New Year, Same Goal: A Debris Free Florida

Posted Wed, 01/04/2023 - 11:00

Florida is unique as the only state that borders both the Atlantic Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico. No matter where you are in the state, you’re never more than 60 miles from the nearest body of water. It also means that the daily choices and activities of Florida’s residents and visitors can easily lead to debris in our coastal and marine habitats. Luckily, our partners across the region are kicking off the New Year with renewed energy and effort in leading marine debris removal and prevention projects to keep Florida’s waters healthy and free of debris.

2022 Hurricane Response Marine Debris Removal Fund Awards

Posted Tue, 12/13/2022 - 11:00

Following a competitive review process, the NOAA Marine Debris Program and National Fish and Wildlife Foundation are pleased to announce the five recipients of the 2022 Hurricane Response Marine Debris Removal Fund. The awards will go to Gulf of Mexico states impacted by the 2020 and 2021 hurricane seasons, totaling approximately $1.6 million in federal funds. Federal funding is supplemented by grantee matching contributions, bringing the total investment of these marine debris projects to approximately $2.4 million. 

Mapping, Marking, and Mobilizing to Remove Derelict Fishing Gear from Delaware’s Inland Bays

Posted Mon, 12/12/2022 - 11:00

The shallow, protected habitats of Delaware’s Inland Bays make for one of the most popular areas in the state for residents and tourists to try their hands at catching blue crabs. In boats or on the shore, recreational crabbers use all kinds of gear, from hand lines, to trot lines, to small traps with collapsible sides, and the Chesapeake style crab pot. Unfortunately, thousands of derelict crab pots have been left behind or lost, and are littered beneath the surface of the Inland Bays. The University of Delaware and Delaware Sea Grant, with funding from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, worked to address the issue by teaming up with recreational crabbers to remove derelict pots.

Capturing Debris and Inspiring Action Along the Anacostia River

Posted Thu, 12/08/2022 - 11:00

The Anacostia River has a long and important history. Today, the Anacostia River watershed is home to more than 800,000 people, encompassing portions of Washington, DC, and Prince George’s and Montgomery Counties in Maryland. Unfortunately, each year hundreds of tons of trash from surrounding lands makes its way into the river. Nearby communities have been working hard to address this problem, and help guide overall reductions in trash and litter entering the river.