Protecting Pacific Northwest Shorelines: A Committed Community Shanelle.Naone Wed, 08/03/2022 - 11:00

Oregon and Washington contain some of the most remote and ecologically diverse coasts in the continental United States. These waters teem with fish and marine mammals, and support tourism and vital subsistence, commercial, and recreational fisheries. Marine debris can be harmful to these waters and all that rely on it. These threats could be derelict fishing gear that entangles and catches marine life, or it could also be large debris such as derelict vessels that have sunk or been improperly disposed of. The NOAA Marine Debris Program partners with community members and organizations in the Pacific Northwest who are committed to preventing and removing these and other types of marine debris.

Taking on Debris Big and Small in the Gulf of Mexico

Posted Wed, 07/13/2022 - 11:00

The Gulf of Mexico is a vast and productive body of water spanning 600,000 square miles with tremendous ecological, economic, and social value. The vast Gulf provides essential habitat for an amazing diversity of fish, whales, dolphins, and species of migratory, wading, and sea birds. Unfortunately, marine debris impacts habitats, wildlife, and industries throughout the Gulf of Mexico. In order to address the issue of marine debris, from large hurricane debris to tiny microplastics, the region needs a comprehensive approach that brings together many partners.

Now Open: Bipartisan Infrastructure Law Grant Opportunity for Marine Debris Removal

Posted Wed, 06/29/2022 - 09:50

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Marine Debris Program is pleased to announce our Fiscal Year 2022 NOAA Marine Debris Removal notice of funding opportunity. Funding for this opportunity is provided through the Bipartisan Infrastructure Law. The NOAA Marine Debris Program will award up to $56 million to fund projects that remove marine debris to benefit marine and Great Lakes habitats and communities. This competition focuses on two priorities: removing large marine debris and using proven interception technologies to capture marine debris throughout the coastal United States, Great Lakes, territories, and Freely Associated States.

Channeling Conservation in the Channel Islands: One Lobster Trap, Balloon, and Piece of Plastic at a Time

Posted Thu, 06/23/2022 - 17:00

Staff, faculty, and students at California State University Channel Islands (CSUCI) Santa Rosa Island Research Station have been working to monitor and remove marine debris from portions of Santa Rosa and Santa Cruz Islands since 2015. With support from the NOAA Marine Debris Program, over 7,500 pounds of debris have been removed from the islands since 2020. This three-year project is an extension of past research and collaborative efforts of partners across the Channel Islands. CSUCI invited the NOAA Marine Debris Program California Regional Coordinator and the program’s California Sea Grant Extension Fellow for a week-long site visit to remove and assess the amounts, types, and sources of marine debris on Santa Rosa Island.

International Collaboration for a Debris Free Gulf of Maine

Posted Thu, 05/26/2022 - 11:00

The Gulf of Maine, which extends from the Bay of Fundy to Cape Cod Bay, is one of the most dynamic and productive marine ecosystems in the world. With its unique coastal habitats and rich waters, the region supports a variety of wildlife from migratory shorebirds to fish, shellfish, and marine mammals. It also provides valuable economic, cultural, and recreational opportunities for people who call the Gulf of Maine home. Unfortunately, marine debris from human-made materials, such as plastics and derelict fishing gear, can damage ocean and coastal habitat and harm wildlife through entanglement and ingestion.

Microplastics for Dinner? A Story About Picky Eaters

Posted Thu, 05/19/2022 - 11:00

Plastic particles less than 5mm in size, known as microplastics, are found everywhere that scientists have looked, including in the coastal waters of New England. The eastern oyster is an important commercial aquaculture species that has been shown to eat microplastics. In partnership with the NOAA Marine Debris Program, marine scientists at the University of Connecticut sampled oysters in the field and performed a series of selection experiments in the laboratory to determine what types of microplastics oysters prefer to eat or reject and how that relates to what is in the natural environment.

Special Funding Opportunity: Hurricane Response Marine Debris Removal Fund

Posted Tue, 05/17/2022 - 11:30

We are pleased to announce, with the National Fish and Wildlife Foundation, a request for proposals under the Hurricane Response Marine Debris Removal Fund is now open through June 29. The program will primarily fund marine debris assessment, removal, restoration, and disposal activities in coastal communities in Alabama, Mississippi, Louisiana, and the western Florida Panhandle.

Taking the Lead to Prevent Hurricane Debris

Posted Thu, 05/05/2022 - 11:00

As we approach the 2022 hurricane season, we are sharing NOAA Marine Debris Program resources to help you prepare for storms and prevent storm-generated debris from accumulating in waterways and on shorelines. Hurricanes and typhoons are among nature's most powerful and destructive events, and when these natural disasters strike they can create massive amounts of debris. That’s why the NOAA Marine Debris Program is participating in Hurricane Preparedness Week and working with coastal states and U.S. territories to help communities prepare for hurricanes and prevent and respond to marine debris.